Question & AnswersCategory: Generalinternship-inquiry
Devon Rodgers asked 52 years ago

Hello,
Are there any internships available? I saw that you answered this question 7 months ago, but I was wondering if anything had opened up since then? If not, could I send in an application to keep on file for the next opening?
Fingers crossed, Devon

1 Answers
Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Test answer

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Marco,  in this instance film/TV rights are with Random House, so you should contact them. I can put you in touch with them if you can email me separately. Thanks!

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Katie
Thanks for writing.  I suggest you intern as much as possible after you get your degree – bookshops, publishing houses, packagers – all are useful for getting hands-on experience of the books industry and will help you build a convincing resume to impress future employers. Stay focused and always keep your big plan and strategy in mind as you make decisions on next steps. Good luck!
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Delphine
Yes, I’m sorry that it did fall through the cracks! Our new site literally just went live. I’m happy to have a quick look at the revised query. It’s unusual for me to change my mind – unless I’ve specifically asked an author to revise and resubmit – but I can look. Thanks.
Sarah 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Andrew
On the basis of 250 words per page,  about 160 pages. Sorry, I can’t work it out with the format you propose, so this is calculated in manuscript pages. Hope that helps!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Jennifer (and anyone else waiting to hear on a query!) I actually kept yours back to read again, so I have it safe and sound. We’ve received a very high volume of queries over the past few months and it isn’t easy to stay on top of them all as fast as we’d like. I will be getting back to you.  Generally, it will be helpful if we can reserve this Q&A page for questions about the industry/publishing/the agency, rather than individual submissions, which are best handled via a follow-up email to our submissions email address. This is something we should probably put on our submissions page. Thanks for following up on this occasion, and sorry to be slow. Glad you like the site!  Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Susan
I really like an unreliable narrator! Making us wonder, gradually, what is true and what is not! Of course, it all depends on how it’s done, and there’s no doubt you’ve got to pull it off skilfully and for a strong purpose in the plot and its outcome. But sure – if you’ve got a big idea, go for it.
 
Sarah 
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Thanks for your question, Riya.  That is certainly a long one!  All of the answers you need are actually under the ‘Submissions’ tab right on this website, but I’ll endeavour to answer your questions one by one here:  Yes.   Yes, you can query as you like.  The order of the information doesn’t matter. Ensuring you tell us what we’ve asked for on our ‘submissions’ page is the key thing.  Please note too that each agency has different submission requests, so a one-size-fits-all approach may not be the best way to tackle querying. Yes. That’s a new one to me.  Name/sex of an author doesn’t influence me a jot, and I find it hard to belive it influences any agent, to be honest.  Feel free to submit your work to Greenhouse under your own name or under a pseudonym (though perhaps flag that it’s a pseudonym), whatever makes you feel most comfortable. Good luck, and thank you for your interest.

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi, Letajah
There is no age requirement for publication (bear in mind we are agents, not publishers). We look for a standout concept and mature writing, whatever your age. However, the publishing industry requires a mature approach –  authors who are able to deal with ups and downs, and the demands of dealing professionally with the deadlines and requirements of  publishing contracts. This generally suggests a writer who is at least in their late teens, but of course there can occasionally be exceptions to that. 
 
Good luck!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Jess
You don’t say if you are a UK or US writer, but Sarah is replying to you – so a North American perspective!
Some agents do a lot with New Adult, but we don’t. To be honest, both Polly and I are more comfortable with core YA (so protagonists of 16-18 max). There’s a ton of fantasy around, so we like to have the biggest possible market when going on sub. 
It’s hard to know what we’ve yet to see – until we see it! However, I’m particularly keen to find fantasy that draws on lesser-represented cultures and mythologies (perhaps Middle Eastern or African influences? Eastern European? Caribbean?), especially written by #ownvoices authors. That said, anything that knocks my socks off because of its strong concept and pacy, smart writing is always welcome!
Good luck to you.
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Fiona
Sorry, but this doesn’t sound like something for us. A publisher would want to match a text with their own choice of illustrator, and the fact that it’s already been published means it already has some level of audience. Good luck with it.
 
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Laura
Thanks for your note. We are sorry to say that we aren’t currently taking on interns, but if you’d like to write to me using our submissions address, I’d be happy to keep your info on file in case things change (which they might).
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Emily
Great to hear from you! YES, as a Canadian you can certainly query and sign with a US agent – and many Canadians choose to do just that. The USA and Canada invariably fall into the North American grant of rights that an agent will sell to a US publisher, so it makes a lot of sense.
Good luck and feel free to query me if you would like. 
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Kathryn
In theory, yes – if the illustrations really serve a function in telling the story in a new and powerful way. Your words “a large number of drawings” give me pause for thought . . . it makes me worry/wonder if the art might overwhelm the text-based story, and if it does (and this isn’t a graphic novel!) then the balance would become crucial.
So the answer really is: Yes, we’re open to that – but obviously the format really has to work!
Sarah
 
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Thanks for your question – and thank you for taking such care over our submission guidelines.  Hugely appreciated.  My feelings about talking birds are a personal thing. I like birds, but I can never suspend disbelief quite enough to believe that they can talk like humans.  I’ve felt like this since childhood. I therefore don’t want to waste writers’ time but encouraging people to send me material where there is a high probability that I won’t believe in it enough to offer representation, especially when there are probably dozens of agents out there who do like a bird that can chatter.  Talking animals are a different kettle of fish (pun intended).  For unfathomable reasons, I can believe in those, and, yes, I am always after a terrific animal story, whether the animals are anthropomorphic or not.  

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Shanica Thanks for your question. It is always best to query one manuscript rather than a bunch, though fine to mention that you have others to offer too. However, please be aware that we are only currently looking for author/illustrators – not picture-book writers who simply have a text to offer. In that case, you would be well advised to try an agency that has a different policy. Good luck! Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Hello Ella
Thanks for thinking of Greenhouse for your work.  I’ll delete the query you sent two weeks ago and await the new version.  
All best
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Steve
These decisions are made by the publisher based on a variety of factors such as target age group and market, potential cover price (which obviously needs to be competitive with similar books in the marketplace), and whether or not the book will contain illustrations. All these factors are put into the mix and decisions emerge from that.
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Ceri
Sure, you can still submit it to us. It sounds as if it will be used only for a college assignment, so there’s nothing to stop you querying agents.
Good luck!
Sarah
 
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Hello
Thank you for your questions.  No problem to ask them all in one go. I will do my best to answer them all in one go in return!

  1.  A story that is outstanding but needs work would not put me off. Working with our clients to help them develop the very best manuscript they can is at the heart of what Greenhouse does. Both myself and Sarah have excellent editorial skills and backgrounds. That said, it’s always wise for a writer to polish and refine their work, making it as good as they possibly can themselves, before sending it in. We see hundreds of queries each week, so polishing before you hit ‘send’ is a must.
  2. I haven’t ever offered rep based on a partial, simply because I have seen it happen too often that a novel starts out really strongly and/or has a great synopsis but then fails to deliver. Unless I knew the author and their work well (eg I’d worked with them whilst an editor or was very familiar with their published novels), I doubt I would offer rep based on a partial. Even then, I would want to be assured that they knew where the novel was going and had a clear path for getting there.
  3. I’m always delighted to learn that a writer has lots of ideas and loads of ambition, so I feel positively about authors wanting to write in different genres and age brackets. That said, it’s important to be strategic and pragmatic when thinking about a writing career. Publishers are likely to want to build an author in one area of the market. Once that’s done, there is room/luxury to expand. It’s something that I talk to my clients about often. One of the potential frustrations of publishing is that it tends to move at a glacial pace, whereas most authors are chomping at the bit to get their work out there!

I hope all of that helps, and that it answers your questions.

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Hello Fiona
I have been waiting for somebody to ask me that question, so am pleased that you have done so!  (It has also prompted me to update the relevant bit of the site.)
Yes. We are intending to run the Funny Prize this year.  Leah Thaxton – who is the Publisher at Faber Children’s Books and my co-judge – and I have just been having a bit of trouble pinning down a schedule that suits us both.  I am hoping to have news very soon.  The minute I do, it will appear under the ‘Greenhouse Prize’ tab on the website and on my Twitter account @NolanPolly, complete with entry details, deadlines etc.
All best wishes
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Deborah
I’m happy to see a submission. It certainly doesn’t immediately preclude you.
Cheers
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Andrea
There is a navigation menu on the left of the Blog page, so you can search on them under (vague, really vague!) section headings.  I’m hoping that suffices?  This iteration of our site is quite new, so if you think something has disappeared from the page that was there a few days or weeks ago, please email me on submissions@greenhouseliterary.com and I’ll take it up with our designers. 
Thanks,
Sarah
 
 
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Hello
Thanks for your question, which is one I get asked a lot. There are loads of very talented school-goers out there all writing novels, something which I find impressive and inspiring. It bodes well for the future of writing and publishing!
At Greenhouse, we read everything sent into us, regardless of the author’s experience or background. However, I can understand your parents’ caution. The publishing business is a tough one and it takes resilience and strength – and a lot of rejection along the way – to become a successful writer. I suspect your parents want to protect you from that as much as possible.
Personally, I haven’t ever signed an author under the age of 18. That isn’t because I think anybody under that age is too young. It’s because, strong as some of the manuscripts from younger writers are, I haven’t yet found one that is good enough to stand out in a difficult market. It is also true that most writers improve with experience. Good authors spend their lives developing their writing and honing their craft. In my experience, it’s often a writer’s second or third book that lands them an agent and even then it can be a subsequent novel that gets them a book deal.
My advice, therefore, would be that – assuming your parents are OK with it – you send your work to agents now if you feel it’s good enough to do so (but be brutally honest with yourself on that front).  Prepare yourself for knockbacks along the way (bear in mind the countless times JK Rowling had ‘Harry Potter’ turned down) and keep at it. It may not be the novel you write at 14 that gets you an agent, but you will have nothing to lose by giving it a go. And remember, no word you write will ever be wasted. You will learn something from every paragraph.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Himanshi
Your question has made me smile because, actually, my colleague Sarah Davies wrote that fab ‘Beginnings’ post, so I am tempted to blame her for your confusion!
In all seriousness though, it’s a good question.  The short answer is that I don’t mind at all if a protagonist makes a trans-Atlantic move one summer.  But I do agree with what Sarah says: this sort of opening for a YA novel is extremely common. I am therefore only ever going to be excited by the writer that does something different with it.  Do bear in mind though that Sarah’s point is really about the opening of the book, not about the setting.
I hope that helps you?  Thanks for getting in touch.
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Jody
I think you would find a better response to the story if you made it present-day – unless there’s a very specific reason to set it 20 years ago (which is pretty much “historical” to children and teens!).  So I think you should see it not so much as “Should I update the technology?” as about writing a story from today’s perspective. 
I hope that makes sense to you. 
Sarah
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Single spacing is fine, thanks. Please could you also ensure that the typeface is 12 point?
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi George
I think it’s fair to say that any serious legal issue in an author’s past is going to be problematic, if you want to write for children or teenagers.  Obviously, it depends what the background check would reveal. A parking offence probably wouldn’t pose problems. But anything more serious is likely to deter both agents and editors due to the obvious sensitivities of working with young people. It would be very difficult to get published and for the publisher then to discover their author has a skeleton in the cupboard that could come to light later on and cause problems. 
I’m sorry to have to say this, but I think that’s the case. There might not be as much sensitivity to this for other readerships – for example, if you were writing non-fiction for adult readers.
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Susan
The key thing to say here is that we aren’t publishers. We are literary agents.  So we are the ones that represent authors – not the ones who get the books on to the shelves. 
We are certainly open to representing teenagers, but representation is a highly selective process and we receive many submissions. We are happy to see your submission, if you follow our guidelines on this site, but the more you keep reading widely and developing your writing, the more likely you are to achieve your goal. 
Good luck!
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Dear Ella
Thank you for considering Greenhouse when thinking about potential agencies. I’ve had a look through my submissions but can’t immediately find anything from you, which suggest that your original query may have gone astray. This sometimes happens in the strange world of cyberspace. Please feel free to resend the query, but please be aware that it normally takes me six weeks to respond as I’ve got quite a backlog and I give careful thought to everything I’m sent, though I will endeavour to get to yours more quickly than that.
Good luck with it!
Polly
As a general note to other writers who may be reading this and wondering about their queries, it’s easier to search for a submission if it’s chased up through the submissions address (submissions@greenhouseliterary.com) than the website, so please do feel free to email me there if you’re in doubt/concerned.

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Dear Jessica
Thank you for your email. The confusion is entirely my fault. You haven’t missed the Greenhouse Funny Prize. We haven’t announced it yet. As you may know, I judge it alongside Leah Thaxton (Publisher at Faber & Faber Children’s Books) and her team, and this year we have had trouble pinning down a schedule that works for everybody. We are hoping to announce something soon. When we do so, it will go out on Twitter (@NolanPolly) and on the Greenhouse Facebook page, and information will appear on the website here too.
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Lynn
Interesting question, and not one we’ve been asked before. If you don’t mind me saying, it seems somewhat unusual to include a character from another author’s novel. It’s one thing to “reference” a character perhaps, and another to take that character over and use him/her in your own story – which I presume is what you are intending. 
The big question is whether or not the original work is in copyright. I can’t remember the precise situation on Agatha Christie, but I do know there’s an estate that is quite powerful.  http://www.agathachristie.com/about-agatha-christie-limited
My guess therefore is that it would be very difficult to use a Christie character – or not without asking permission, paying (possibly quite a lot) and including credits etc. I have a gut feeling you could be opening a major can of worms, and if you can avoid this situation it might be wise to do so. 
Do hope this helps.
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi there
Yes, sadly the formatting does disappear as you paste text into an email. Agents are all quite aware of this and are able to see beyond that as they read.  So don’t worry – just do your best with it! 
Thanks,
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

To be honest, I don’t know. I’ve never heard of them. Writers can come directly to us (if they follow the submission guidelines on our website), so we don’t tend to be involved with third parties.

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi there
You should submit your query to Polly Nolan. As our website says, she represents clients living outside North American.
Sarah
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Dear Steph
Thanks for your question. As is often the case, there isn’t a straightforward answer. Some YA fiction has swearing in it. Some doesn’t. As a general rule, if the swearing is vital to the plot or dialogue, it is acceptable. It’s worth bearing in mind that a swear word on the page often packs a more powerful punch than hearing somebody use it, so less is often more.
I hope that helps?
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Harley
We would love the 5 pages to be doubled spaced, but we know that the formatting is lost when you paste the pages into an email, so don’t worry. Not sure what you mean by “cut in near the end of the chapter”.  We simply require to see the first 5 pages, whatever those may be.
Hope this helps!
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Amy
It’s a good idea to given an agent (and subsequently, editors) as much flexibility as possible in assessing your work. If you present a series as a fait accompli then we’ve no choice but to view it in that way. And it’s not always easy to commit to five books (or however many!). I suggest you say that the book “stands alone”, but there’s “potential for sequels”.  That way, we can make our own decisions. And whether you’re writing a standalone OR a series, that first book still needs to be a self-contained story, with a really satisfying conclusion – not a cliffhanger, designed to keep the reader waiting till the next book comes along. The one exception to this is if you’re writing a young chapter-book series (say, between 5000-25,000 words), which is conceived as either “character led” or “concept led”.  In that case, it helps to know you have a series mapped out. But for anything older, give us options.  
Hope this helps.
Sarah
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Hello Nadine
Thanks for your question.
I like mixed narrative voices – or, indeed, any form of storytelling that mixes things up and/or feels different or fresh or innovative. BUT (yes, there is always a ‘But’), it’s crucial that the author is in control of the various strands and can make them work convincingly. One of the common pitfalls I see, especially amongst debut authors, is an attempt to write in two distinct voices and the two voices sound exactly the same.
If an author can pull it off, it can be a compelling and taut way of telling a story. If an author can’t, it’s likely to be a wince-inducing mess.
Does that help?  Definitely give it a go if you’re thinking about it. You won’t know until you try it out.
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Annie
The question for me is why are you set on making the character age 19. Presumably because the story is about their experience at college or employment rather than high school?  The point is, we are particularly looking for teens still within the school/family structure – rather than living as independent adults.  So it’s less about the age, and more about where core YA tends to fall. I hope that is useful!
Sarah
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Dear Steph
From what you say, it would seem to me that your novel is for adults.   Although many adults read YA novels (which is what can cause confusion for writers when thinking about their target audience), the heart of the market is readers who are still at school.  They tend not to be so interested in books where a protagonist is working or at university/college.  Of course, there are always exceptions to the rule, but if somebody queries me with a novel in which the protagonist is 18 or older, it tends to be an automatic pass from me, unless I feel the novel is exceptional and would work equally well with a younger hero or heroine.
I’m not sure how many YA novels you’ve read but it might be worthwhile having a look at what is working well in that market.  You will quickly get a sense that way of what is meant by ‘YA’. Reading as widely as you can in the market for which you want to write will also give you context for your own novel and give you a clearer sense of your target audience.
Good luck with it, and thanks for your questions.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Very much appreciate you checking before sending the attachment – always wise to do so!
Please go ahead and send the pdf.  Perhaps you could mention in your query email that we had this exchange?  I get so many queries that I would hate it if yours was inadvertently deleted because I’d forgotten I’d said ‘yes’ to the attachment.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Thank you very much for checking our submission guidelines before querying us. I know it’s a tedious exercise for a querying author, but it makes a big difference to agents and to how your approach to being a writer is perceived. It just looks that much more professional, if you know what I mean?
Unfortunately, I am not looking for short stories, even those linked as yours are.  It’s just a personal thing, based on my subjective belief that I would struggle to place them with a publisher.  The great thing about the publishing business though is that it is subjective – so the fact that I feel as I do doesn’t mean other agents will feel the same.  There may be several out there looking for something exactly like your work.
Good luck in finding them, and on the road to publication.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Thanks for your question. You are right: Greenhouse only represents picture books where the author also illustrates the text. However, lots of other agencies represent text only and I am sure they would love to hear from you.  Good luck!

Sarah Davies Staff answered 5 years ago

Hi Shanah
You’re right, I don’t mention chapter-books specifically, but they tend to be at the younger end of middle grade. Yes, I’m open to them – so long as they aim at being a series, not a standalone. So that would either be a concept-led or character-led series.
I hope that helps.
Sarah
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Hello Amy
Thank you for your question.  350 words does sound a bit long for a query letter.  My advice is: the shorter the better.

Like any agent, I want to jump straight into your novel.  If I’m interested in taking it further, I will ask you for any information I need.  So, when it comes to querying, I’d suggest a very short introduction and a synopsis (no longer than one A4-size page, double-spaced) that gives the outline of your novel in a straightforward way, including any plot twists or spoilers. I don’t need ‘blurb’ or information about your background, unless there is something in your background that is relevant to your writing or to being published

One thing to be aware of though is that agents all have different submission criteria, so it’s worth taking the time to check each individually rather than doing a blanket query.
Hope that helps?
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Hello Sandie
Don’t worry: books written in the first person, present tense are not a turn off for agents. It’s just me who – at the moment – is a little weary of them, as it seems as though everything I am sent these days is written in that voice.  That said, I have recently signed a new client writing in the first person, present tense because their manuscript is just so good.
For what it’s worth, if I were a writer, I would never re-write my novel from a different point of view just because an agent has suggested it, unless I believed, deep down, that that was how the book should be written.  An agent’s response to a novel is subjective: what one agent loves, another may dislike.  You should write the book that is calling to you.  That will make it the best book.

Where I would consider re-working a novel’s POV, were I an author, is if a number of agents have made the same comment.  If a lot of industry experts react in a similar way to your manuscript, it’s probably worth giving serious consideration to what they are saying.
I hope that helps? Good luck with your manuscript.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 years ago

Yes, as long as they are written in English.

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello Kathleen and thanks for your questions.

I’ll answer them starting with the last, if that’s OK.

Yes. At Greenhouse we pride ourselves on working with unpublished writers to help them make their manuscript good enough to sell to a publisher.  Both Sarah and I have immense editorial experience, having worked our way up through the editorial ranks of major publishing houses before becoming agents.  We love to edit and if we see potential in a manuscript and find an author who wants to work with us, nothing makes us happier!

It’s unlikely that we would reject a manuscript that had a great hook and publishing potential, no matter how much work was required, as long as the author showed some persuasive writing ability.  We want to work with people, not take over their books, so it’s important that we believe they have a voice of their own and, even if that’s not shining through in the first draft we see, that we can detect that voice in there somewhere. We would also talk to an author before signing them, to ensure that they are willing to do the necessary work with us (not everybody is/believes they need to) and that we share the same vision for their work.  It’s really important that we – and the author – feel that we can work in happy partnership.

Aside from the obvious reasons for rejecting a submission – poor writing, derivative idea, the author clearly being out of touch with the market, unconvincing/implausible first person narrative etc – there are numerous reasons for us to pass.  Lots of things – some obvious, some nuanced – inform our decisions.  When we sign somebody, it’s because we really believe in them as a writer and we really believe that we can get them a publishing deal.  If we don’t have that conviction, we will pass. But remember: we don’t have a crystal ball. Nobody can know for sure what will get a publishing deal. It’s a subjective business too. Not everybody will love a story . . . which is what makes this world an interesting – and often challenging – one but it’s also why we will always sign up the novels we love if we really believe they have potential.

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi Millie
This is a tricky one! In my view, a 20-something protagonist will take you out of the YA age band.  Because it’s not just about “age” in some vague way, but more that the life of a 20+ person is going to be different to that of a 16 year old.  In your 20’s you’ve generally achieved a level of independence, left education, and are quite likely in some long-term relationship. It’s no longer the teen experience.
My advice would be to try and keep your protagonist between 15-18, if at all possible. Is it necessary to increase her age in each book? Can you not compress the various episodes into a shorter time span?
I hope this helps!
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi Kimberly
Apologies for the slow response! We seem not to be receiving notifications that questions have arrived – must look into that!
I agree, the pitch/synopsis thing is a bit confusing and we will change to “pitch” on the site.  Though the fact that we do say only “three paragraphs” is probably an indication that we don’t intend a full-blown synopsis.
A pitch is fine – you are querying the book.  But if you want to add a little more to give a stronger idea of where it will go, then that is OK too.  We just don’t want one-page/two-page outlines.
Hope this helps!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi Sreyoshi
I’m replying for Polly as she’s away at the Bologna Book Fair.
If you’re asked to send a full manuscript, you should just send on a “reply” email to the agent’s request. As to what to expect as confirmation of receipt – you can really only ask the requesting agent. Sadly, another agent isn’t going to be able to help you!
 
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi, Lani
I’m happy to take a look, but bear in mind I’m closed to queries for a couple of weeks.  Generally it’s better to go to Polly because Australia is part of the UK/Commonwealth grant of rights. But on odd occasions, I’m fine with taking a look.
Best
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi James
Yep, a cliff-hanger is pretty unattractive! Sorry, but that’s the case. Bear in mind that if you get a deal for Book 1, the sequel (if we even succeed in selling a Book 2 to the publisher) wouldn’t be out for at least a year after the first. That’s a long time for a reader to wait to know what happens, and your ending is likely to feel disappointing. You should make your story feel like it stands alone, with a satisfying conclusion. That doesn’t preclude a sequel set in the same world/characters.
Hope that helps.
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello Jessica
Thank you for getting in touch.  Writers can submit their work at any stage but, in my experience, the most common mistake that people make is sending in their work before it’s ready.  To give yourself the best possible chance amongst fierce competition – we get a LOT of queries each day! – it would be wise to polish the work and get it as good as it possibly can be before you start sending it to agents, including me.  
I hope that helps.  The best of luck with your novel.
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi, Lisa
I’m happy to see another query and pages if the story has been significantly changed. Please include that info in your query, just to refresh my memory when I open the submission.
To throw a question into things …. When you say upper middle grade, I wonder what you mean.  Upper MG doesn’t really exist as a category (or piece of shelving in a book store). With core mainstream MG I’d be looking for characters age 11-13.  For younger fiction/chapter books, a bit younger than this – say age 9. 
I hope this helps, and I look forward to seeing the query. Please note that our sub guidelines have changed a tiny bit – it’s all on our website.
All the best
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi, Brittney
It isn’t impossible to get published without social media accounts, but you are definitely making things a lot tougher for yourself – and less appealing for publishers. 
These days so much publisher promotion, and self-promotion, for authors and by authors, is done online. And now, more than ever before, authors are asked to help in that gigantic task of getting the word out – about your book, about you as a writer.  It’s all about networking and having some kind of “platform”. Or how will people hear about you and what your book offers? Best of all, this kind of publicity is free.
If you are serious about a writing career, I would strongly suggest that you do start working on your social media profiles. Pick just one or two options – maybe Instagram and Twitter? – and start making contacts. If you do get a publishing deal you would have to do all this then in any case. So why not embark now, and give yourself the best possible start?
Hope this helps!
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello
I’m lucky enough to act as Matilda’s agent. If you want to send your query for Matilda via me at PollyN@greenhouseliterary.com, I can help; or you could contact her via her UK publisher (Scholastic)
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello Genya
Yes. I am hoping this will go ahead this year.  Faber & Faber and I are currently liaising on final details. Check back on this site and keep an eye on social media on 1 June.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi Robbie
Thanks for getting in touch. Sorry for the confusion.
I’m still discussing final details of the Prize with Faber & Faber. The details you have from Writing Magazine Competitions Guide appear to be wrong. (As an aside, thank you for bringing that to our attention.)
Please have a look at this site, and on social media and Twitter on 1 June for details.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Elaine
Thank you for your questions.  To be honest, I think you may be worrying unduly (which is understandable, given the overwhelming amount of advice out there for people trying to navigate seemingly-daunting waters).
The key thing to remember is that every agent (and editor and publisher) is looking for one thing:  a brilliant story. If you have that, you don’t need to worry about everything else.
That said, there is no doubt that if you can signal to a busy agent what sort of book you are submitting, it helps a lot. As a result, all sorts of jargon has sprung up – hence terms such as ‘Middle Grade’ and ‘Upper Middle Grade’ and so on.  Indeed, I am quite often sent work that people have categorized using words/terms that I’ve never heard of – so, honestly, don’t get into a knot about it.  If you’re worried, specifying the age (or the target age) in numbers is perfectly acceptable (eg My book is for readers of 7+ OR The target age for my novel is readers of 10 to 12).
Similarly, don’t get into a pickle about genre. If your novel is clearly one particular genre, say that.  If it isn’t don’t worry. As you say, genre should be clear from the pitch.
I don’t mind people comparing their work to other books, as long as the comparison is apt and not exaggerated. People sometimes set themselves up for a fall, claiming their book is like X, when X is a classic that has stood the test of time or a novel that has sold millions of copies. It’s unlikely somebody’s unedited debut is going to be as good as that, so the reader is inevitably left feeling underwhelmed.  If the comparison is apt, it is helpful to know it, simply so that I can make a quick decision on whether or not it’s something I’m looking for.  But not having a comparison wouldn’t put me off.
Ditto pointing out how your work fits in a wider context. If you can see that clearly, mention it. If not, don’t worry about it.

Your submission email should be about helping an agent understand what you’re sending him or her, yes – but, above all, it should be about getting the agent to your novel as quickly as possible. That’s what an agent is interested in reading.
Hope that helps.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello Sheena
I’ve had lots of questions from people asking the same thing. It’s great to know there are so many keen potential entrants out there!
I’m liaising on final details with Faber & Faber at the moment. Our aim is to announce shortly. Keep an eye out on the Greenhouse website and on social media at the start of June. There will be news shortly!
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Una
I love animals, but am probably not the best agent match for an adventure involving talking animals. Sorry, but I do think that’s the case.
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Mandi
You don’t say whether you are US or UK, but I think I can answer for both Polly and I on this …
We don’t make a blanket rule on this issue, but in general we prefer to avoid previously published books — it just makes life/submission that bit harder in a market that is already pretty tough. 
Good luck with it.
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Travis
It’s true I’m seeking fiction about immigration, but my thoughts are more about immigration from Central America (in the case of the US market) and the current European migrant crisis (from a UK market perspective – though, to be honest, there’s a lot of crossover here between the US/UK markets in their interest in this). Your material also doesn’t sound as if it’s particularly aimed at children or teens, which is where we specialize. The “previously published” aspect is another difficulty. Put all this together, and I’d say this isn’t one for us. 
Good luck with it!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Sandra
That’s OK with us, but can be tricky. If a publisher likes the text but not the art they would likely want to commission their own illustrator. But there’s a lot of hurdles to jump over before that (ie, do we see potential in it in the first place), so happy to take a look.
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Elle
Yes, we are open to authors living anywhere in the world, so long as they are completely fluent (to the level of writing great fiction) in English. Where you live is less important, though ultimately can be significant if you aren’t available to promote your book within the North American market. That being said, so much is done now online ….
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi Paul
You should go travelling!  In this day and age, people don’t need to be in close proximity to work on books together.  (I have clients in Australia, who I’ve never met, but with whom I’ve worked closely editorially, as have their US and/or UK publishers.)  As long as you can access good wifi on a fairly regular basis, there shouldn’t be any problems.
The only time you are likely to be needed back in the UK is at publication time, should you get a book deal.  That is because publishers like their authors to be ‘on the ground’ to promote their books if possible.  This is especially true when writing for children or Young Adults, as school visits are so important.
However, given that it generally takes 12-18 months from receiving an offer of publication to actual publication day, you should head off. After a year’s travelling, you’ll know whether you need to be back or whether you can carry on for another couple of years.  I think you may be in a win-win situation!
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello Nick
Thank you for your question. Sorry to take a while to respond. For unknown reasons, and as sometimes hapens, your question was diverted to our junk folder and we’ve only just found it.
I’m not the right agent for a rhyming fantasy story as I’m not convinced there is a market for books like that.  However, I may well be wrong (Sarah Crossan, for instance, writes brilliantly and successfully in rhyming text for Young Adult readers).  I think the only way you are going to know for sure is by sending the book out on submission to agents.  If somebody thinks there is a market for yours, they will get back to you pretty quickly, I suspect.
The best of luck with it.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello Samera
Yes, is the simple answer. We do indeed have several successful clients who live in Australia.  I am lucky enough to represent them. It may sound odd, but I’ve never met any of them in person, much as I would love to.  But these days, that’s not unusual, and the internet allows for productive and good working relationships.
There are no hard-and-fast rules about how we communicate/work together.  Sometimes it’s email only, others it’s email and Skype or FaceTime.  I will always work in whatever way suits the author.
I don’t currently deal directly with Australian publishing houses, but only because the majority of UK publishing houses have sister companies or distributors there.
You’ll find all you need to know about how to submit your work to us on the ‘Submissions’ section of this website.  In the first instance, you should submit your work to me (as you’re not living in North America).  If it’s not for me, but something that I think Sarah will like, I will forward it to her.  Sarah and I work closely together and regularly forward queries to one another.  That said, if you’re convinced your book will appeal only to Sarah, feel free to query her, but maybe include a brief explanation of why you’ve opted to do so so that she doesn’t think you’ve queried her in error.
Good luck with it!
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Rowan
Apologies for taking so long to reply to your question.  I’ve discovered this morning a number of questions that, for unknown reasons, went into our ‘junk’ folder.
You have probably finished your book by now and my reply is redundant.  However, in the hope that my response is helpful to you or to anybody else in the position you were in when you initially mailed, I would advise that it is always good to have all your material as developed and polished as possible before querying.  That is because, if an agent asks to see the whole thing, you don’t want to be scrabbling round trying to finish artwork or text under time pressure.  Certainly, when it comes to illustration, it would be wise to have two or three finished pieces of artwork, as well as the whole thing illustrated in rough.  (That said, you will need to check each agent’s submission guidelines separately to see what they ask you to send.  Not all agencies ask for the same thing.)  You might also find it useful to bear in mind that, when it comes to a publisher potentially offering for something, they may commission text only because they have an illustrator they would prefer to use.  But that is a few steps ahead at this stage in the process.  
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Nadine
Apologies for taking so long to reply to your mail. I’ve discovered this morning a batch of questions that, for reasons unknown, went into our ‘junk’ folder.  Yours was amongst them.
I don’t need to see comparison titles.  The reason some agents ask for them is that they help quickly to give a busy agent an idea of the sort of book you’ve written, and the market at which it is aimed.  If you’re able to communicate this info succinctly in a different way, that’s absolutely fine.
You are right in your instinct to err against appearing over-ambitious.  Many years ago I was lucky enough to work with a brilliant and experienced editor who used to warn against comparing a debut novel to a classic or a bestseller.  He said that, by doing so, you inadvertently set it up for a fall.  I’ve always felt those were wise words.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello Amy
Apologies for taking so long to reply to your question. We discovered this morning that, for unknown reasons, a batch of questions went into our ‘junk’ folder a while ago. Yours was one of them.
I would always assume that people are querying several agents at once. Indeed I would advise them to do so. (Agents can take a while to respond, as we get so many queries each day.  If an author waits to query each one individually, they might end up waiting years to get their work out to everybody.)
The only thing agents would ask is that, if you are out on multiple submission and one agent either calls in the full manuscript or offers you representation, you let the other agents know.

As regards whether I am open to visually descriptive fantasies with animal characters from folklore, I’m not at the moment.  That doesn’t mean that other agents won’t be. If I’ve learned one thing about this business over the years, it’s that it’s subjective!

The best of luck with your querying.

Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hello Sandie
Sorry to send what I know will be a disappointing response, but unless you’ve completely re-written the novel, it’s probably wise not to re-submit to me. 
When I’m considering a manuscript, I’m thinking not only of the storyline (which is, of course, important) but also of the writing style and the voice.  If your re-write has been to change the novel structurally but not to change the writing style/voice, it’s unlikely that I will change my mind about it.  If, however, this is really a completely new book, you’re welcome to re-submit it.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Dear Debbie
The simple answer is ‘no’.  I never delete anything that follows our submission guidelines. (Not following them would result in a different answer!)  What I wouldn’t do, in the first instance, is click on a link embedded in the query.  As per the submission guidelines on this site, we never click on links in queries, for security reasons.
What I would do is have a look at your synopsis and writing sample.  Were I interested, I’d mail asking you to send the full manuscript.  After considering that, I’d either pass or I’d contact you to discuss the idea further and talk to you about the Facebook link etc.
For what it’s worth – and bearing in mind that not every agent will think as I do – although the Facebook link is potentially interesting, for me there is the question of how many children who will be reading your novel would actually have Facebook pages or be on Facebook? Is Facebook therefore the best social media platform with which to link?
I hope all of that helps.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 years ago

Hi Brett
Polly here.  There is loads of information online.  If you do some research, you’ll find dozens of resources that can advise you.  From joining/forming a critique group, to engaging professional help, from books you can buy to websites that will give you tips, the world is your oyster.  My advice is that you just get stuck into your research as you’re likely to find there is almost too much – rather than too little – advice out there.  
The best of luck with it.

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello
I will re-open imminently, most likely at the start of next week (w/c 26 Nov).  I’ve been busy reading entries for this year’s Greenhouse Funny Prize, which is why I’ve been closed.  I’ll post it on Twitter, and update the ‘Submissions’ section of this site once open again.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

That’s lovely to hear!  Your students have excellent taste.
We don’t run the Prize every year and there is no guarantee that a winner will get a book deal as part of the competition, hence there not being a published winner every year.  We’re currently in the throes of judging the (excellent) entries for the 2018 competition, so watch this space . . . 
 
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 3 years ago

Hi Kate
It means that if you are an author/illustrator who is writing a picture book (ie, not an older novel), we need it to be less than 1000 words in length. The market is resistant to longer texts. I hope this clarifies!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 3 years ago

Hi Kate
It means that if you are an author/illustrator who is writing a picture book (ie, not an older novel), we need it to be less than 1000 words in length. The market is resistant to longer texts. I hope this clarifies!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 3 years ago

Hi Kate
It means that if you are an author/illustrator who is writing a picture book (ie, not an older novel), we need it to be less than 1000 words in length. The market is resistant to longer texts. I hope this clarifies!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 3 years ago

Hi Kate
It means that if you are an author/illustrator who is writing a picture book (ie, not an older novel), we need it to be less than 1000 words in length. The market is resistant to longer texts. I hope this clarifies!
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Dear Megan
Thank you for taking the time to write.  In the first instance, please send your query to me.  I read everything sent to me (as long as it follows our submission guidelines, which are on our website).  If it’s not for me but I think that it might work for Sarah, I will forward it to her.  Sarah and I work closely together, and often share manuscripts, so please don’t worry that, because I am not a huge fan of sci-fi, your work won’t be given serious consideration. 
The best of luck with it!
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Paul
Sorry: I typed a response to your question the day we received it, but have only just realised that it wasn’t published.  
I think that as long as you are open about the history of your novel, most agents will be happy to consider it. 
Good luck!
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Dear Emma
Thanks for your question.  Yes, we are open to UK submissions.  The ‘Submissions’ tab on this website always has our most up-to-date submissions information on it, so if you’re ever in doubt, please feel free to check there.
Best
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Lauren
Polly here. I’m responding to your question rather than Sarah because Sarah is currently dealing with a family illness.  That’s why she is closed to submissions at the moment.
You are welcome to send our query to me or, if you can sit tight, Sarah will be open again.  It’s likely to be in several weeks’ time, but if you keep an eye on this website and on social media, she’ll let people know once she re-opens.
Best
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Dear Helene
We are open to anybody writing for children and Young Adults in the English language, but we don’t have an agent who specializes in Danish writers.  You should be able to find all of the information you need on the website here.
Thanks for getting in touch.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

No we wouldn’t, as we represent authors writing for children and Young Adults, so we’re not the right agency for a book like this.

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Dear LJ Moss
Thanks for your question.  It’s London Book Fair this week, so time is short. I hope you’ll therefore forgive me for keeping my answers brief.
I would say that editors have less time to edit than they did previously.  Editorial teams are generally smaller, which means fewer people to work on the same number of – or more – books. Also, the pace of publishing is simply more rapid these days (like life in general!) Twenty years ago, it wasn’t uncommon for an editor to find a manuscript that they liked and to work with an author on it for several months before taking it to an Acquisitions Meeting.  (The Acquisitions Meeting is the meeting in-house at a publisher where it’s decided which manuscripts will be bought and published.)  That sort of nurturing of a writer would be almost unheard of now, not because editors don’t want to do it – I suspect most would love to! – but because there isn’t time these days.
The other change I think has occurred is that, whereas previously editors generally decided what a publishing house would acquire, that ‘power’ has shifted towards Sales, Publicity and Marketing.  
Yes, one of the key things on which Greenhouse prides itself is working with authors editorially before we submit their manuscripts to publishers.  Both Sarah and myself have vast editorial experience as we have worked in some of the UK’s major children publishing houses.  Both of us were Publishing Directors before becoming agents.  We can see the potential in raw material and know what it takes to get it to a point where an publisher will want to acquire it.  

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello
Thanks for your question.  By ‘cost’ do you mean how much do you have to pay?  Generally, there shouldn’t be an ‘upfront’ cost.  Rather, agents take a commission from an author’s earnings once the author has a book deal.
If you have a look on the Society of Authors website, it will give you a lot of objective help and advice on what to expect from an agent, what is standard within the industry and what sort of commission rates etc are standard amongst agents.
Polly

Sarah Davies Staff answered 3 years ago

Hi Chris
Thanks for your question. It’s tricky to answer because I don’t know the age of your proposed readership. If you’re writing for the “core” MG reader, I’d say 20K is pretty short — I’d be looking for a word count nearer 40-65K.  20K works for a younger MG reader — it’s really a longer chapter-book length. It’s hard to imagine you tackling “large fantasy tropes” in that word count, and I’m going to guess there’s a bit of disconnect between length and language/style? I obviously can’t be sure, but that’s my hunch. 
I hope this helps.
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Sandie. 
Thank you for getting in touch. 
Nobody is going to turn down a brilliant novel because it’s too long, so don’t worry too much about word count.  That said, I think most editors and agents lean towards brevity, so if you can get the 72,500 words down to around 60,000 – 65,000, without compromising your book, it would probably be no bad thing. (A good place to start might be with adjectives, as there is a tendency amongst debut authors to over-use them; ditto similes.)  As I say though, if a novel is really special, no agent or editor will pass on it because it’s too long.
 
Good luck when you submit it to agents.
 
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Dear Lillian
You’re more than welcome to resubmit, especially if you’ve done a re-write (as opposed to tinkering round the edges).  I consider everything sent to me, but am likely to give the same response to something that hasn’t changed considerably.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Dear Mervyn
I’m open again now. Sorry for any confusion.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Thanks for your question. The short answer is ‘no’.  A 35-year-old protagonist pushes a novel firmly in to the adult realm.  For Y.A., the protagonist would ideally be around 16 years old.  Some agents might consider someone a bit older.  For me, 16 tends to be the cut off point.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Rezoana
Thank you for getting in touch. The synopsis should tell us the key points of your story – including the ending and any plot twists along the way – in the shortest and most direct way possible.  It shouldn’t be blurb.
Synopses aren’t easy to write (I know this having had to write tens of hundreds of them over the course of my career).  It’s well worth investing time in yours though as, often, the synopsis will be the first piece of your writing that an agent will read.  
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hi
We share subs with each on a regular basis – i.e. if one of us receives a query that isn’t right for us but we think the other might like it, we’ll let her know.
If you’re in the UK, please query Polly.  If it’s not right for her, she’ll send it over to Sarah.  It’s fine to flag in your query email that you think your sub is better suited to Sarah.
Thanks for checking before querying – and good luck!

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Ann
Thank you for getting in touch.
At Greenhouse, we only represent picture books when the author is an illustrator as well. So I’m afraid that your picture book isn’t right for us.
Lots of other agents represent text only and would happily consider an idea like yours.  Your best bet is probably to consult the “Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook”, which you’ll find in your local library. It lists all of the agents in the UK, specifying what they represent and how to submit your work. (I’m assuming you’re based in the UK.  In case not, a US version is also available, for authors and illustrators in North America.)
Good luck!
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Melly
Polly looks after our clients outside North America.  She also sells in to the US market.  However, if you strongly believe that your novel is a better fit for Sarah, it’s fine to query her.  Put her name in the ‘subject’ box and then explain in your covering email your reasons for choosing her.  Good luck!
Greenhouse

Sarah Davies Staff answered 3 years ago

Hi Mohammed
I think you should stick with your own culture, if choosing that setting feels most comfortable for you. Also, I’m a student of Arabic so have a particular interest in the language. 🙂 It’s impossible to say how well the story will “travel” for American/British audiences without taking a look, but I wonder if you might consider including an American or British character alongside the Kuwaiti ones if that would make it feel a bit more “approachable” for a non-Kuwaiti audience? 
Sarah 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Catherine
Polly here.  An author’s age wouldn’t really factor in to my thinking if I loved the story and felt it was pitched accurately at the child reader.  That said, it’s important to be aware that publishing houses want authors who are happy to do as much publicity as possible.  In the UK, that publicity generally involves school visits, sometimes talking to several big groups of children in a day – something many authors, regardless of age, find daunting! As long as the author is up for it, that’s fine by me.  My only other hesitation is about subsequent books.  I sign clients not for a single book but because I believe they have several in them.  So you could see why a writer of, say, 28, might appeal more than a writer of, say, 108 (though that impressive age would make a nice PR angle!).
It may surprise you to learn that I am actually more concerned about lower age groups.  I am occasionally sent queries by parents, on behalf of their children of 8, 9 or 10, who have written novels.  It’s always great to see that youngsters are bursting with stories, but I can’t ever see myself signing anybody younger than 17.   That is because the road to publication, and then being a published author, can be a tough one.  There is a lot of rejection, of criticism of work, of re-writing, of harsh reviews (in the media and online).  A certain robustness is needed to deal with these things and I would feel unhappy about subjecting a writer still in childhood to it.
Hope that helps/reassures you?
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Suzanne
Thank you for your question.
We are an agency, so we don’t publish books.  We sell manuscripts to publishers.
Unfortunately, neither Sarah nor myself represents poets.  I believe that there are agencies out there who do.  You may be able to discover more about them by doing some online research or referring to the useful “Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook”, which lists UK (and in the US editions, American) agencies and what they are looking for.  You should be able to find a copy in a good bookshop or in your local library.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Dear Chris
Thanks for getting in touch.  ‘Dystopian’ – in MG and in YA – is still something that editors aren’t jumping on but, of course, that may change in the time it takes you to write your novel.  If this is a book that is calling to you and you feel compelled to write it (as is so often the case with the very best books), perhaps the way to approach it is to think about how vital the ‘dystopian’ label is. Could the book be pitched as something else?  What other themes and ideas does will be covered? Can you get agents to read it without putting a preconceived notion in their heads?!
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Thank you!  Louie will be delighted and touched.  
It’s best to send it to her c/o her publisher.  The address is:
Publicity Department, Nosy Crow, Baden Place, 14 Crosby Row, London SE1 1YW.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello
We represent a small number of illustrators who are also writers, but we don’t represent illustrators who don’t write.  There are a lot of agencies for illustrators out there.  Your best bet might be to consult the “Writers’ and Artists’ Yearbook”.  It lists all of the agencies in the UK, including illustrator-only ones.
Polly

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hello Amy
Confusingly, the same question seems to have been posted by a Sandie almost at the same time as you posted your question.  There must be something in the air (or, probably more mundanely, there’s a glitch in our system). Hopefully my response will help you both.
That said, there isn’t an exact answer to your question. If you are worried that you’re trying to pack too much in to your opening three chapters, I suspect that’s exactly what you are doing.  Instinct is a good thing to listen to when writing.  The long and the short of it – no pun intended – is that what you should be aiming for are gripping chapters that keep the reader engrossed and wanting to turn the page.  Some people do this by using very short chapters (Dan Browne is one who springs to mind). Others do so by ending each chapter on a cliff hanger (exactly what Jed Mercurio did so well at the end of every episode in the ‘Line of Duty’ series on BBC TV).  Other writers set up characters with whom we immediately want to spend more time. Some go for a really big, exciting opening and keep up a relentless pace.  There are lots of ways to ensure a compelling opening without cramming ‘all the best parts’ in to the first three chapters of a novel.
The other thing to bear in mind is that you want to use your opening chapters to move an agent (presumably, in the first instance?) to call in your whole manuscript.  You therefore most definitely don’t want to cram ‘all the best parts’ of your book in to the opening chapters.  You want that agent to be gripped by the whole thing.  So don’t overwhelm yourself – or your book or your reader.  Think about pace, about hooking and then keeping your reader and about how your plot is put together and how it unfolds as your reader turns the page.
If you feel stuck until you know about chapter length, pop into your local bookshop and skim the books that are selling well. That will give you an indication (though possibly not a consistent answer).  As a rule of thumb, for MG, I’d be inclined to err on the side of brevity.  Kids are often reading after a long, tough day and sometimes just relish a satisfying, short read before bed.  A bit like the agents you’ll be hoping to hook, in fact!
 
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 3 years ago

Hi Terril, As long as the story is compelling and well executed, then the age of a female protagonist should not hurt you in finding an agent who represents adult literary fiction. Query away and good luck! Best wishes, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Denise, Your submission should include a brief description of the first book with a sense of where you intend the series to go over the course of five books. Then include the first five pages of your first book pasted below the query letter. All best, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Scott, She stated she is currently writing a book, so she is definitely a writer. She’s not impersonating anything. No matter how she describes her work, all you need to say is: “That’s wonderful! Good luck with your writing. I’ll be cheering for your success.” Hope that makes sense. Best wishes, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi NJ, We do sell audio rights, but we prefer to sell the entire project from start to finish rather than sell a portion of the rights on a project that is already published. If you would like to query new work, see our submissions guidelines for the procedure. Best wishes, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Yes, it’s actually preferred that you submit your work without illustrations if you are not a professional illustrator. Publishers will pair your manuscript with an illustrator, so we would not suggest getting your book illustrated prior to submitting it to agents. Best wishes, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Congrats on your soon-to-be finished trilogy! Representing a series where titles have already been published is understandably quite difficult. We would have to feel strongly that there’s a compelling argument for why now traditional publishing is the right decision. The switch from self-published to traditional is not enough of a reason in itself. If you end up querying Greenhouse, you will be more successful if you can answer that question in your query. All best, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Dedra, Yes, it sounds like enough has been revised that you can resubmit to me. Please mention “Resubmit” in the subject line of your email so that I have that info in hand. I appreciate you asking. All best, Chelsea

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Chris
Thanks for your question. This is a tough one to answer. I never like to rule out whole genres on principle, because the truth is it’s all about how the manuscript reads. Does it really grab from page 1? Does it do something unique? Do we love the characters? Is it immersive? etc etc. Even if something wouldn’t be top of my wishlist in principle, my mind can be totally changed by a game-changing manuscript!
That’s probably where I’d stand on a MG space opera. It wouldn’t be top of my wishlist, and possibly those of some editors. But we are all ready to have our minds changed — if the story is fab enough.
Probably not quite the cut-and-dried answer you hoped for, but it feels true!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Abbey
I do think there’s a market for anthropomorphic animal stories — if really well done. In fact, I’ve met several editors who’ve told me they’d like to find something along these lines, whether Geronimo Stilton or Warriors (which is a huge-selling series, so perhaps that answers the question!).
That said, it’s got to do something fresh and different. It’s no good producing ANOTHER Warriors when we already have one. And so on. So, make it adorably charming, hugely exciting … or whatever. But make it feel fresh and utterly compelling.
I hope this answers your question!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hello, Ry
You were clearly very prescient in writing a “mysterious virus” story! And your question is tough to answer. Here’s my view …
I am personally seeing quite a few virus stories in my inbox, most of which have probably sprung to life for their authors since the pandemic took off. I will admit that my instincts right now are to go for stories that feel hopeful, inspiring, fun — and a real break and antidote from the real world. Perhaps especially in YA, where I feel we’ve seen a lot of virus/apocalypse stories in recent years.
However, stories like this are a bit less prevalent in MG. So as long as the story reads really well, and it isn’t obviously taken from our current situation, you could find that agents are receptive. As ever, it all depends on how much we fall in love with the story.
I hope this helps.
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hello! The answer to your question depends on the wording of your agency agreement (I presume you have one). Typically it will cover all your work, whether collaborative or not, but check the wording. If it does allow you to separate out your writing (ie, between collaborative and solo work) then I would suggest a conversation with your agent to see if they would be open to you doing that. If you plan an ongoing solo career, alongside the collaborative one, it might be possible to find another agent to take you on, but it’s a little sticky if you will still be publishing other books under the same name. As you can imagine, this could cause some confusion with contracts and option clauses etc. 
So, I’d say consider all the factors and communicate openly with your current agent. I think that approach will help you decide what to do next. Is the problem that your current agent doesn’t want to represent your solo work — or that they just don’t think they can sell the solo manuscript? If the latter, then that is something to note as you may get a similar response elsewhere. 
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Jo
Our policy (as given on our website) is only to respond to queries which we want to take forward, and the 6-8 weeks reading period refers to that. You should have received an auto-response acknowledging receipt and setting out that policy. I’ve had a quick look through our submissions inbox, and our junk and deleted folders, and I can’t find an email with a name that looks like yours, which is very strange.  It makes me wonder if your query ever arrived — especially if you didn’t get the auto-response.
We are currently closed to submissions (since April 28), but please feel free to query again when we are open — date TBC.
All the best
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi, Darren
Well done on publishing your novel. 
Your question is a tricky one as I do indeed suspect you’d need to go through an agent to approach Netflix. That might happen through your literary agent or through a film/tv agent (we generally work with co-agents in this manner, since the film/tv world is very different). Sadly, since you aren’t our client, it’s not possible for us to help you with this. I guess my best advice would be to try and interest a film/tv agent in your book, and I’m sure you can find resources online that could give you some names. 
My other advice would be to try and find a literary agent for your second book, as they would then look at the best way to exploit all the rights on your behalf. 
Good luck
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Jonathan
You can contact me via our submissions address: submissions@greenhouseliterary.com
Thanks,
 
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Tanasha,
Your best bet is to find an agent who represents text-only picture books. Publishers like to pair authors and illustrators themselves. It’s best not to spend the time and money having the art created prior to your book deal. Good luck!
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Chloë,
This sounds like an interesting format and publishers certainly might be interested in publishing it. When the project is ready to query, check and see if Greenhouse is open to queries (we’re currently closed) and feel free to submit to us. The submissions page on this website has all the info on how to do that. Best of luck with your writing!
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Lilian, Yes, when we reopen, feel free to resubmit. All best,Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Dorothea,
When I reopen to submissions, I will happily take a look. Word counts are a good rule of thumb, and it is smart to determine what age and type of kid reader you’re trying to reach with your manuscript, and then revise accordingly. But word counts are not the be-all and end-all. A great story is the most important thing.
All best,
Chelsea

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi, Leah
I think it is very possible to find representation, even with your first book published by Kindle Direct. Agents are looking for a great marriage of story text and art (I’m presuming you’re an illustrator too), and even if this particular book isn’t for them, if they like what they see (enough), they can easily ask you what else you are offering or might write/illustrate in the future. 
I think you should approach more agents and monitor the responses. I’d guess that if you don’t get anywhere, it could be because agents feel you aren’t quite ready yet. I wouldn’t necessarily attribute rejections to the Kindle issue. 
I hope this helps. 
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi, J.S. 
I’m sure it’s frustrating that we are closed to queries, so apologies for that. 
I need to ask – are you a UK-based writer looking to sell into the UK marketplace? I should say at the outset that I am primarily a US agent, concerned with the North American marketplace, so I may not be the right fit for you. However, if you feel that your novel (I presume it’s a novel, not a picture book text) could be a great fit for me, please send it to our submissions address (with my name in the title line of your email) and I’ll take a look. We may well not be open to general queries until the beginning of September, but I’m happy to look at exceptions like this and give you a fast response.
Thanks
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Jordie
The first question I have to ask you is whether your non-fiction work is aimed at children/teens or adults? If it’s aimed at adults then we are not the right agency for you; we don’t handle adult non-fiction. 
I think that with adult NF you do indeed need some kind of platform. I don’t mean you necessarily need to have been published before, but you need to have some strong credentials for writing about your chosen subject. What expertise or experience do you bring to your theme that would give the material weight and make it stand out on the shelves? Are you an authority on the subject? Do you have a background which gives you a specially marketable angle on it?
If you are writing for children, this is perhaps less important (in some circumstances). You could be a history teacher or a mental-health professional (etc, etc) and write well for that age group — though you still need a strong angle. 
So, in my view it depends what you are writing and for whom you are writing it. I hope this helps.
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Claudia,
Greenhouse is currently closed to submissions, but when we open back up, we do accept manuscripts from author/illustrators who are international. Make sure you check the agent pages and submission guidelines to see who is the best fit for your work before submitting. Best wishes for your writing!
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Amanda,
Thanks for checking in for clarification and for thinking of me for your work. Greenhouse is still closed to submissions. The submissions page on the website is always the most up-to-date spot on submission info. I hope to see your work when we do open back up.
All best,
Chelsea

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hello, Susan
We are hoping to re-open around October 1. After Labor Day (September 7) we will post a note on the Submissions page of our website with the opening date, so please do check in then. 
Thanks
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi, Abi
Thanks for your question. Our position is that we ARE open to author-illustrators (ie, people who both write AND illustrate professionally), but we are NOT seeking picture-book texts only (ie, unillustrated). The website says this: “We are NOT looking for picture book texts (ie, by writers who aren’t also illustrators).” We have tried to make the wording on the site as clear as possible, but I will go back through it again, and see if I can clarify further to avoid confusion. 
I hope this helps to explain things.
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi, Katelyn
Thanks for your question and for your interest in Greenhouse.
Unfortunately, we don’t currently have a remote internship to offer. I wish we could help you, but hopefully you will be able to find the right opportunity elsewhere. Good luck with your quest to enter the books world. 
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Sarah
Yes, we are open to submissions, and have been since October 1, as indicated on our website. Unfortunately we’ve had some updates pending on the site, so haven’t been able to answer questions via this page for a couple of weeks. Thankfully it’s all sorted now!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi Divya
Thanks for your question. While it would be wonderful to have the time to help the many aspiring authors who query us, very sadly this just isn’t possible due to the demands of our workload. 
The best thing would be for you to work with a freelance editor, or other mentor, who can help you with the more technical aspects of fiction writing. When you query us, your manuscript really needs to be in the best shape it can possibly be. We often do edit manuscripts we take on, but that is usually more in terms of story structure than grammar. 
Wishing you all the best
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hi, Jessica
Sorry to say, Greenhouse doesn’t represent the kind of book you mention. We specialize in books for children and teens, plus a small amount of fiction aimed at adult readers. 
I suggest you try one of the agent databases that are available. A good place to start would be AAR, which is the Association of Authors’ Representatives. They list agents looking for every genre, plus all listed agencies/agents have a degree of accreditation since there are criteria for membership. 
Good luck!
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 2 years ago

Hello and thanks for your message. 
You sent your query a few hours before our auto-response was amended, but it should have been received just fine. Queries are not automatically deleted, and everything that arrived from October 1 onwards is with us safely. 
I hope this helps to reassure you. 
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 1 year ago

Thank you so much for the invitation! I’m flattered and happy to discuss further. I’ve made contact via your conference website to provide my email and continue the conversation. 
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 1 year ago

Yes, I do like to see the artwork when that is part of the graphic novel query and proposal. In my Query Manager form there’s a “For Artists and Illustrators” space down at the bottom which has spot to put in your portfolio link and also an option to upload a sample of your artwork as well. Thank you for thinking of me for your graphic novel!
All best,
Chelsea

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi Chris
The market has actually been pretty strong for deals, especially since about May/June when a little optimism returned. So I’d say go ahead and query. Just  bear in mind that both Chelsea and I are closed to submissions until January 18. Querying over the holidays isn’t a good idea, even if agents are open. Most of us are finishing up, trying to get through the reading we have already requested.  
Any new manuscripts we sell now won’t publish until 2022, so everyone will be hoping that things will be well back to normal by then!
Best wishes
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Adult fiction is an age category, compared with say middle grade or young adult. Within women’s fiction I’d say there are a few categories/genres — eg, cozies, suspense, romance, contemporary (eg, ELEANOR OLIPHANT). I wouldn’t get too hung up over all this. However, it would be very useful for you to work out what your comparative authors/titles are – so you can point to authors with good sales tracks, who are writing roughly in the same area as you. 
I hope this helps. 
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi Nikki
So glad you enjoyed the blog. Those were the days — I’m afraid it’s very tough now to find the time to blog, and certainly not regularly. I remember the “Anonymous” blog post very well. I felt so strongly about it, and still do. Anonymity doesn’t lead to good things; accountability for what we say and do is so key. 
All the best to you
Sarah
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi Shelley
I think it is fine to resubmit, if the manuscript has changed very extensively (ie, not just tinkering). 
Bear in mind our submissions are now all via Query Tracker (see Submissions page of our site), and we are closed to new submissions until January 18. 
All good wishes
Sarah

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi Sara,
Thanks for checking on this. Always feel free to withdraw and re-query if you’d like to submit a new-and-improved version. There’s no penalty for doing so, and I do appreciate reading the material that authors feel is their strongest work.
Best wishes,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 1 year ago

Thanks for checking! No, we do not consider picture book authors’ manuscripts. Other agencies do and they would be the best fit for your work. 
All best,
Chelsea 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi, Ester
Thanks for your question. In this instance, I suggest you submit only the first sample, but put in your query that this will be a series and you have two follow-up titles too. That is fine for an agent to get a sense of your writing and art style. 
All the best
Sarah
 
 

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi Amy
Thanks for your nice message. I’m also always delighted to find fellow Arabic speakers (thought I can’t quite claim to have reached that level yet!) and enthusiasts. 
You sound amazing, but I’m sorry to say I am not currently seeing a moment when I will reopen to submissions due to the pressures of looking after my existing client list. Were I open, I would definitely take a look at your manuscript. 
I’m sorry to see you go, but wish you all the best in finding a great agent match. 
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi Joe
Thanks for your inquiry. I can tell you that the film/tv rights in FINLAY DONOVAN IS KILLING IT have been optioned. If you would like to write to me on info@greenhouseliterary.com  I would be happy to tell you more. 
Best
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi Sophie
Thanks for your question. I did reopen  to queries in January, but unfortunately am now closed again and that will be for the foreseeable future. I’d love to suggest that you query one of my two agent colleagues, Kristin and Chelsea. Kristin is just starting to build her client list (and she’s amazing), so now could be a great time to approach her!
So sorry to disappoint you.
Sarah

Sarah Davies Staff answered 1 year ago

Hi there
I think we have to say that you can only query one of us. I am closed to submissions for the foreseeable future, and Chelsea and Kristin work so closely together (as we all do, as a group which is is constant contact) that anything one of us sees as a “it’s great, but not for me but X might really love it” submission is going to get forwarded in any case. We are constantly sharing information and ideas, so you won’t lose out. 
Thanks
Sarah
 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 1 year ago

It’s fair to be frustrated by non-personalized rejections. I’m sure it does feel like agents are not reading the work when they aren’t specific in their replies. While it would be rash for me to speak for all agents–no one person or agency could claim to do that–I do know that in general we all wish that we could respond more fully and in a more timely manner to authors and illustrators. Agents do this job because we love championing and working with creators, not because we enjoy rejecting them. We receive hundreds–often over a thousand–queries each month, so if you put yourself in an agent’s shoes you can imagine why these form rejections came to be. One thing that I can assure you: agents do open and read their queries. We may not have the time to personalize every single response, but we do carefully consider each one. We hear and understand your frustration, but we can assure you that there are no robo-rejections happening and certainly not from Greenhouse agents. I hope this helps ease your concerns.
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 12 months ago

Yes, if a specific editor or publisher has requested a submission, this is helpful information. Thanks for checking!
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 12 months ago

Your question about the lack of disability representation is a big question that publishing is currently trying to address and still has a long way to go with addressing. Certainly a lack of representation on the staffs of agencies (Greenhouse included) and at publishing houses is a part of the picture, though not a complete answer to the unconscious biases and ableism in the industry. I can’t speak to why those agents passed on your work, but I do think it’s a good sign that they provided feedback, which is not always the case. My hope for you is that you continue to put representation of disability in your work and continue to pursue publication as a writer who is also a wheelchair user. Readers need more of these stories, and I firmly believe there is room in the market for them. Please consider querying the Greenhouse agent that you feel best suits your project. I wish you the best of luck! 
All best,
Chelsea

Kristin Ostby Staff answered 11 months ago

Hi Shelley! Thanks for the tipoff! I’ve updated my page to include a place for ten sample pages. 

Kristin Ostby Staff answered 11 months ago

Hi Matt! I’ve just added a place for ten sample pages. Thanks for checking in! 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 11 months ago

I’m sorry to hear that you’re having trouble sending your submission. The best way to query one of our agents is to use their Query Manager form. My form is available at https://QueryManager.com/ChelseaEberly and Kristin’s form is available at https://QueryManager.com/KristinOstby. Sarah Davies is not open to submissions at this time. Sometimes changing your browser and clearing cookies can be helpful. If you are still having trouble, please let us know. Query Manager can also troubleshoot things as well using their contact form available here: https://querymanager.com/contact.php
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 11 months ago

This is a great question. A query letter should be no more than one page when pasted into a Word document and set in 12-point Times New Roman font–and the tighter you can get it, the better. I like to see an elevator pitch in a sentence or two that tells me the genre and age category as well as a quick logline about the story. If you look at the copy on Amazon and B&N.com you will often see these kinds of quick elevator pitches at the top of the descriptive copy. This can also be a moment when you include comp titles by saying “perfect for readers who love” or “think X meets Y.” There should also be a brief description that is 2-3 paragraphs max, this should feel like cover copy, though if there’s a massive twist, a POV shift, or something else interesting about the structure that I can’t know from the 10-page sample, be clear about that in your descriptive copy. Then a quick bio that is a few sentences about yourself, focusing on your writing career and attempting to answer the question why you’re the perfect person to write this book.

Ultimately, the sample pages are what sells me on a story. So put your best foot forward with your query letter, but know that it’s your stand-out writing that will make the real difference.

All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 10 months ago

Hi Norma,
First, I am so glad to hear that your husband is doing well. Unfortunately, Greenhouse does not represent previously published materials, since publishers are typically only interested in buying new materials to publish, so we would not be the best fit for your series. I wish you the best of luck in finding a home for your work.
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 9 months ago

We are not offering internships at this time, but thank you for asking. 
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 9 months ago

Thanks for checking! Yes, I would still love to see your full manuscript, and I am happy to have you send it my way even though I’m closed to queries. My policy is that if I’ve requested someone’s work, then I’m always open to seeing it when it’s ready. Looking forward to reading yours!
All best,
Chelsea

Kristin Ostby Staff answered 6 months ago

Hi Kay! This has been updated! 

Kristin Ostby Staff answered 6 months ago

Sure! Send it my way! 

Kristin Ostby Staff answered 6 months ago

Yes, I do. More on what I’m looking for can be found in my site bio.

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 6 months ago

Hi Kostis, Thanks for reaching out. I’ve changed my response policy so that I’m responding to all queries via Query Manager. I want to offer better closure to querying authors. As you say, there’s a lot of stress involved in querying. On the con side, it takes more time to respond to each one. If you have not received a decision, then it is still under consideration. All best, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 6 months ago

Hi Jenn, Thanks for your question. I respond to all queries. It takes more time, but I think offers authors more closure about their query. Thank you for thinking of me for your query when I reopen! All best, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 6 months ago

Yes, there is nothing stopping a Canadian citizen from publishing a cannabis cookbook in the US. Your first step is to query agents who focus on selling cookbooks. All best, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 6 months ago

Thanks for your question. We do accept submissions from authors around the world, including New Zealand. All best, Chelsea

Kristin Ostby Staff answered 6 months ago

Are you revising with your mentor? If so, I would absolutely wait until you’re finished to submit. You want to go out with the strongest story possible! Knowing that you’ve workshopped a novel via a mentorship is always a great thing, yes. Thanks, and looking forward to your query coming my way! 

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 months ago

Thank you for asking! I was hoping to have responded to all queries by mid-November, but unfortunately that did not happen after I caught the flu (thankfully not covid) and a family member passed away. I appreciate the reminder to update the website with my new date: January 21st. I hope that the delay as I take December to carefully consider the remaining queries will not inconvenience writers too much and that those who are looking forward to querying will be pleased to know that I am starting the year with no backlog of queries ahead of their submission. I truly cannot wait to see your stories and appreciate everyone’s patience as I give each query its due!
All best,
Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 5 months ago

The best (and only) way to query us is to use our Query Manager form which is available via the Submissions page on this website. There you can attach a dummy and paste in the text of your picture book. Because we’re looking for artists who write picture books, it’s important to show your artwork as part of your query.  Best wishes, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 months ago

Thanks for asking this. After a rejection, you may submit to another agent at the agency if your project aligns with their wishlist. Please always be sure that you only submit to one agent at a time. Wishing you all the best!

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 months ago

It’s important for an author to know their ultimate career goals. If your goal is to have a specific manuscript published by a Big 5 publisher, then it would be wise to sign with an agent first and have them submit the manuscript to those publishers. If you would like to be published by an indie press, then there is nothing wrong with querying those presses at the same time as agents. I would always suggest letting agents know as soon as an offer to publish comes in so that if an agent loves your writing, they can sign you and help you negotiate the offer and contract as needed.

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 months ago

Hi Lisa, My goal is to have all queries responded to before reopening, and I’m close, but not there as of today. I’ve moved the date back a week so that I can still give each query the attention it deserves. Thanks for asking about my timeline, and thanks for your interest in querying me as well! Best wishes, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 days ago

Thanks for your question! We will not be doing a Greenhouse Funny Prize this year. All best, Chelsea

Chelsea Eberly Staff answered 4 days ago

Thanks for checking back in! We’re not currently looking for an intern, but if that ever changes we will post about it on social media. Feel free to follow Greenhouse on Instagram and our agents on Twitter for the latest news. All best, Chelsea